US Catholic Faith in Real Life

True national defense keeps focus on the common good

Some threats cannot be stopped with military might.

By Kevin Clarke |
Article Justice

Recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic will require some difficult personal and institutional soul-searching. Families will have to reevaluate consumer choices and work, life, and screen-time balance; civil society will have to ponder its evolving understanding of who and what is truly essential; and at the government level even grander policy shifts will be necessary.

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It’s time to treat essential workers like the cornerstones they are

An invisible army supports our modern lives every day.

By Kevin Clarke |
Article Your Faith

As quarantines and stay-at-home orders roiled the United States and  nations around the world in late March, in a matter of days more than 4 billion people worldwide faced some form of home lockdown. Economic distress is now widespread because of the novel coronavirus pandemic, but the suffering that COVID-19 will engender will not be equally distributed. Social and economic vulnerabilities and inequities that make the difference between life and death for thousands have quickly become apparent.

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Our nation needs merciful sick and family leave policies

33.6 million people do not have access to paid sick leave.

By Kevin Clarke |
Article Justice

On Twitter on March 15—St. Patrick’s Day weekend and, unhappily, the first when the United States truly faced up to the COVID-19 crisis—an Uber driver posted some thoughts after a shift driving clients from bar to bar. He needed the money, he explained, so he had no choice but to work in the tight confines of his car with his no-doubt lively and potentially infected customers. But if he had his way, he said, he would have followed the advice of public health officials and stayed home with his wife and young children as the novel coronavirus raged across the country.

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