US Catholic Faith in Real Life

To maintain her calm, this Catholic sister tweets prayers to @POTUS

For Sister Susan Francois, a personal project in accountability has become a public witness.

By A U.S. Catholic interview |
Article Culture

Sister of Saint Joseph of Peace Susan Francois grew up knowing that the Catholic faith is connected to making the world a better place, but she probably didn’t expect she would be using her voice as a woman of the Church to influence public discourse on Twitter, one of the world’s top social media websites.

Advertisement


The man behind the politics of racial resentment

Two new documentaries shine a light on the political project of Steve Bannon.

By Danny Duncan Collum |
Article Culture

Stephen K. Bannon, former chief strategist for Donald Trump, could be the most dangerous man in America. He understands that America’s non-college-educated workers are right to be mad about 45 years of stagnant or declining wages, and, ever since his days at Breitbart News, Bannon has proved himself a master at using mass media to divert that anger away from the billionaire class and toward immigrants and Muslims.

Advertisement


Fair wages are more than a living wage, Pope Francis says

Popular movements provide hope for the dignity of work and rights of workers.

By Stephen Schneck |
Article News

Easter morning, I got a text from a reporter who covers religion for the Washington Post. She had seen a Tweet from me the day before about an Easter letter from Pope Francis to the global popular movements in which His Holiness, noting the devastating impact that the Covid-19 virus was wreaking on the working class, suggested that “This may be the time to consider a universal basic wage.”

Advertisement


Unless our nation agrees about morality, laws will fall short

There are some problems that a law cannot solve.

By Steven P. Millies |
Article Justice

We tend to want problems to stay solved once we solve them. In political life, this means that we generally think about law as a permanent solution to problems. We think, “If Congress would just do x, then it will be fixed,” or, “If the Supreme Court would only do y, then we’d never have this problem again.” We especially tend to hear things like this in election years. But experience proves that this is not the way things happen. In political life, nothing ever stands still.

Advertisement


Our nation needs merciful sick and family leave policies

33.6 million people do not have access to paid sick leave.

By Kevin Clarke |
Article Justice

On Twitter on March 15—St. Patrick’s Day weekend and, unhappily, the first when the United States truly faced up to the COVID-19 crisis—an Uber driver posted some thoughts after a shift driving clients from bar to bar. He needed the money, he explained, so he had no choice but to work in the tight confines of his car with his no-doubt lively and potentially infected customers. But if he had his way, he said, he would have followed the advice of public health officials and stayed home with his wife and young children as the novel coronavirus raged across the country.

Advertisement


During this primary election, vote for family justice

Economic justice must be high on our list of priorities this election year.

By Kate Ward |
Article Justice Your Faith

Voting can feel fraught for Catholics. Neither national party’s platform advances the full range of issues people of faith care about. A bright spot in the 2020 election, however, is the wealth of bold proposals to further economic justice. Candidates are offering solutions to many sources of deep economic worry for ordinary families, including wages and livelihood, child care, and health care. 

Advertisement


Rethinking politics: A better path to faithful citizenship

If our politics ever is going to be something better than a football game, it falls on Catholics especially to bear witness to a real alternative.

By Steven P. Millies |
Article News

For the last 44 years, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops has published Faithful Citizenship, a “teaching document on the political responsibility of Catholics.” There is much in Faithful Citizenship to recommend it. Yet, it has begun to seem to me like it is time for something new.

Advertisement